See also

Family of Charles BADHAM and Margaret CAMPBELL

Husband: Charles BADHAM (1780-1845)
Wife: Margaret CAMPBELL (1778?-1818)
Children: Margaret BADHAM (1803- )
Mary BADHAM (1803-1864)
Charles David BADHAM (1805-1857)
Charles BADHAM (1813-1884)
Robert BADHAM (1816- )
Marriage 5 Apr 1800 Canongate, Edinburgh, Scotland

Husband: Charles BADHAM

Name: Charles BADHAM
Sex: Male
Father: -
Mother: -
Birth 17 Apr 1780 London,
Occupation Medical Practitioner - oProfessor of Medicine
Death 10 Nov 1845 (age 65) St George, Hanover Square, London

Wife: Margaret CAMPBELL

picture

Margaret CAMPBELL, 1800?, age 22

Name: Margaret CAMPBELL
Sex: Female
Father: -
Mother: -
Birth 1778 (app)
Death 29 Jul 1818 (age 39-40) Brighton, Sussex

Child 1: Margaret BADHAM

Name: Margaret BADHAM
Sex: Female
Birth 2 Oct 1803 Bloomsbury, Middlesex
Parish register on Ancestry

Child 2: Mary BADHAM

Name: Mary BADHAM
Sex: Female
Spouse: John HURNALL (1803-1892)
Birth 3 Oct 1803 Bloomsbury, Middlesex
Census 1861 (age 57-58) Leighton Buzzard, Bedfordshire
Desribed in census as blind
Death Apr 1864 (age 60) Leighton Buzzard, Bedfordshire

Child 3: Charles David BADHAM

Name: Charles David BADHAM
Sex: Male
Spouse: Anna HUME (1808-1870)
Birth 27 Aug 1805 Westminster, London
Occupation Medical Practitioner - Physician not practising and Clergyman
Census 1851 (age 45-46) East Bergholt, Suffolk
Living with wife and two children plus Mother and Sister in law and nieces Charlotte Mary and Amy Menilla DODGSON and nephew James Hume DODGSON
Death 14 Jul 1857 (age 51) East Bergholt, Suffolk

Child 4: Charles BADHAM

Name: Charles BADHAM
Sex: Male
Spouse 1: Georgiana Margaret WILKINSON (1831-1888)
Spouse 2: Julia Matilda SMITH (1821-1856)
Birth 18 Jul 1813 Ludlow, Shropshire
Occupation Clergyman & Classical Scholar
Census 1851 (age 37-38) Greenwich London
12 Stainton Place
Living with his first wife and sons Charles and Herbert
Census 1861 (age 47-48) Harborne, Staffordshire
Metchley Abbey (part of)
Emigration Apr 1867 (age 53) from England to Sydney Australia
Death 27 Feb 1884 (age 70) Sydney Australia

Child 5: Robert BADHAM

Name: Robert BADHAM
Sex: Male
Birth 11 Feb 1816 Winchester, Hampshire

Note on Husband: Charles BADHAM

Oxford Dictionary of National Biography (2013 online edition):

Badham, Charles (1780 - 1845), physician and classical scholar, was born in London on 17 April 1780, the son of

David Badham. After receiving a sound classical education he entered Edinburgh University, where he graduated

MD in 1802 with a dissertation entitled ‘De urina et calculis’. Badham was admitted a licentiate of the Royal

College of Physicians of London in 1803. On 8 May 1806 he matriculated from Pembroke College, Oxford, as a

gentleman commoner. He graduated BA (1811), MA (1812), BM, and DM (1817). In March 1818 he was elected

a fellow of the Royal Society, and in September of the same year he was admitted a fellow of the Royal College

of Physicians. He was censor of the college in 1821, and wrote the Harveian oration in 1840, delivered in his

place by Sir Henry Halford.

Badham began to practise in London in 1803, and before long he was appointed physician to the duke of Sussex.

He also became physician to the Westminster General Dispensary, and in partnership with Dr Crichton of Clifford

Street he delivered lectures in London on physic, chemistry, and the materia medica.

After the peace of 1815 was agreed, Badham decided to visit the continent, where he spent two years travelling;

he visited the less-known parts of the kingdom of Naples and passed to the Ionian Islands and then to Albania,

where he was consulted by Ali Pasha. He then crossed Mount Pindus, went through Thessaly, and by

Thermopylae to Athens, and then, by the isthmus and gulf of Corinth, to the Neapolitan coast. Badham's

fondness for travel, in which he spent nearly half his time, and his taste for classical literature, was indulged at

the expense of greater professional fame and fortune in London. Badham was content to earn his living as a

physician to travellers on the continent.

However, in 1808 Badham demonstrated his worth as a physician by the publication of Observations on the

Inflammatory Affections of the Mucous Membrane of the Bronchiae, a second edition of which, corrected and

enlarged, appeared in 1814 under the title of An Essay on Bronchitis, with a Supplement Containing Remarks on

Simple Pulmonary Abscess. In this treatise bronchitis, acute and chronic, was for the first time separated from

peripneumony and pleurisy and the other conditions with which it had previously been confused, and its

history, differential diagnosis, and treatment were established.

In 1812 Badham published Specimens of a New Translation of Juvenal, which was followed by a version of The

Satires of Juvenal, Translated into English Verse in 1814. These works were very severely criticized in the

Quarterly Review by William Gifford, himself the author of a translation of the same satirist, who considered

that in Badham's Specimens ‘in no instance has he entered the authors mind: he sees not his object; he feels

not his energy; he comprehends not his dignified sarcasm’ (QR, 8.64).

In 1827 the chair of the practice of physic at Glasgow became vacant, and Badham was recommended by his

friend Sir Henry Halford to the duke of Montrose for the post. Although the Scottish physicians were not pleased

at seeing an Englishman preferred before them, Badham's lectures justified his appointment. At Glasgow he

devoted himself almost exclusively to the duties of his chair. The vacations he spent in travel, mostly in the

south of Europe. Badham was a contributor to Blackwood's Magazine. There appeared in April 1829 his ‘Lines

written at Warwick Castle’, which had been printed with notes, for private circulation, in 1827. He also prepared

‘An itinerary from Rome to Athens’, but it was never published.

21 DEC 2014 Family of David Badham #9105 - continued Page 2

Badham was twice married: in early life to the beautiful Margaret Campbell, first cousin of the poet Thomas

Campbell. Their four sons included the naturalist Charles David Badham (1805 - 1857) and the classical scholar

Charles Badham (1813 - 1884). There were at least two daughters. About 1833 Badham married, secondly,

Caroline, eldest daughter of Admiral Sir Edward Foote (1767 - 1833). Badham died in London on 10 November

1845.

Royal College of Physicians: Roll of Fellows, (Volume III, page 190)

d.9 Nov 1845

Charles Badham, M.D., was born in London. After a sound classical education, he applied to the study of

medicine, and proceeded to Edinburgh, where he graduated doctor of medicine in 1802 (D.M.I. de Urinâ et

Calculis). He was admitted a Licentiate of the College of Physicians 4th April, 1803, and about that time entered

as a gentleman commoner of Pembroke college, Oxford. As a member of that house, he proceeded A.B. 5th

June, 1811, A.M. 6th November, 1812, M.B. 23rd March, 1817, M.D. 27th March, 1817, and then coming again

under examination at the Censor’s board, was admitted a Candidate of the College 30th September, 1817, and a

Fellow 30th September, 1818. He was Censor in 1821, and he delivered the Harveian oration in 1840. He was

elected a fellow of the Royal Society 12th March,1818.

Dr. Badham settled in business in London in 1803, and before long was honoured by the appointment of

physician to the duke of Sussex. In 1808 he gave proof of his attainments as an observant practical physician by

the publication of his "Observations on the Inflammatory Affections of the Mucous Membrane of the Bronchiæ,

12mo., Lond.," in which bronchitis, acute and chronic, was for the first time separated from peri-pneumony and

pleurisy, and the other conditions with which it had hitherto been confounded, and its history, differential

diagnosis, and treatment established. About the year 1818, Dr. Badham gave to the world a forcible and

eloquent translation of the "Satires of Juvenal," in which he displayed a thorough knowledge of his author, and

so much poetical talent, that even Mr. Giffard, then editor of the Quarterly Review, and the severest critic of his

time, himself the author of a translation of the same satirist, felt himself obliged to admit that though in the

tenth satire Dr. Badham had to contend with Dryden, he had "well sustained the contest."* This translation, with

considerable corrections, was republished in the Family Classical Library.

Dr. Badham’s fondness for travel, in which he spent nearly the half of his days, and his love of classical literature,

to which he devoted much of his time, were unfavourable to his obtaining that extent of medical business

which, had he remained at his post, would, with ordinary diligence, assuredly have been his portion. But he

preferred the more easy, though less lucrative, occupation of travelling physician to persons of high degree.

When, in 1827, the chair of the practice of physic in the university of Glasgow became vacant, Dr. Badham was

recommended by his friend, Sir Henry Halford to the duke of Montrose, as one whose talents and

accomplishments would tend to increase the fame of a rising university. And although Scotchmen were not

pleased at having an Englishman preferred before them, Dr. Badham’s lectures displayed so much ability, that

his colleagues soon discovered they had reason to be proud of the services of so brilliant a professor. At

Glasgow Dr. Badham was but little solicitous of medical practice, and devoted himself almost exclusively to the

duties of his chair. The vacations he spent in travel, and mostly in the south of Europe. He died in London 9th

November, 1845. Dr. Badham was a frequent contributor to Blackwood’s Magazine.

* Gent.Mag., 1846, pt. 1.

The Royal Society table of Fellows confirms his admission as a Fellow of the Royal Society on 12 March 1818.

Note on Wife: Margaret CAMPBELL

Her Burial Register entry (At Andrew's (Old Church), Hove, Sussex) states that she was 39 years old.

In "Literary Reminiscences of Thomas Campbell" by Cyrus Redding, it states that she was "The first cousin of the

poet Thomas Campbell; she was the first wife of the physician and classicist Charles Badham. She was called

"Mary, Queen of Scots" on account of her beauty." It also records "To return to Cheltenham - other country

walks were proposed, but the poet [Thomas] wished to go into the town and call upon one or two persons with

whom he was acquainted. While this matter was discussing, a gentleman of a thick-set person called, whom he

introduced to me as Dr. Badham. The poet disliked the doctor; and, indeed, he had nothing prepossessing about

his personal appearance. He had married a relative of Campbell’s, the beautiful Margaret Campbell, the

21 DEC 2014 Family of Charles Badham #9095 - continued Page 5

daughter of his aunt, Mrs. John Campbell, who was no more, and whom he much deplored. The poet had a

great distaste for him, and gave me his reasons. The doctor was of that class of persons whom one cannot like at

first sight, nor afterwards, one cannot tell why - a "Dr. Fell" kind of personage.

The ODNB biography of her husband, Charles Badham, states that Margaret was a first cousin of the poet

Thomas Campbell. This would imply either:

1) Her father and Thomas's father were brothers. However, the biography of Thomas Campbell states that his

father was Alexander Campbell, and that his brothers were Archibald and Robert.

2) Given that he said that Margaret was the daughter of his aunt, Mrs John Campbell", it could be that John

Campbell married another Campbell who was a sister to Thomas's father.